Teacher Information Packet

(This information was sent to teachers before 

I made my Lewis presentation at the 

Cumberland County Elementary School

Burkesville, Kentucky)

 

1. Letter to School Librarian

November 9, 1998

Dear Mrs. Amy,

Along with the BBC -PBS video of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe I have enclosed several items for the teachers which might be helpful in sharing the video with the students.

- a copy of the letter that I sent to the libraries in our area

- the plot outline of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe from Kathryn Lindskoog’s Journey Into Narnia. Pasadena: Hope PublishingHouse,1998. pp. 109-110.

- brief comments on all of the Narnian books from the back cover of my paperback copy of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. New York: Collier Books, 1970.

- a brief summary of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe from Martha Sammons’ A Guide Through Narnia. Wheaton: Harold Shaw Publishers, 1979. pp.31-33.

- a copy of the handout that I shared during my lecture at Lindsey Wilson College on November 3rd 

I look forward to visiting with the students after they have seen the video. Thank you for your assistance in reaching out to help encourage the people in your community in good reading. If I can be of any further assistance, please contact me at one of the above telephone numbers.

Sincerely.

Richard James

2. Letter to 5th Grade Teachers

November 11, 1998

Dear Mrs. Jackie, Mrs. Renata, Mrs. Marsha and Mrs. Vickie,

I am looking forward to meeting with your fifth grade students, November 19th and 20th, at 1:30 p.m., with half of them on Thursday and the other half on Friday. It is my understanding that they will be watching the video of C.S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Monday through Wednesday of that week. I have given Mrs. Amy several items which might be helpful in sharing this video with the students.

- a copy of the letter that I sent to the libraries in our area

- the plot outline of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe from Kathryn Lindskoog’s  Journey Into Narnia. Pasadena: Hope PublishingHouse,1998. pp. 109-110. 

- brief comments on all of the Narnian books from the back cover of my paperback  copy of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. New York: Collier Books, 1970.

- a brief summary of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe from Martha Sammons’ A  Guide Through Narnia. Wheaton: Harold Shaw Publishers, 1979. pp.31-33.

- a copy of the handout that I shared during my lecture at Lindsey Wilson College on  November 3rd

In addition I am enclosing some suggested projects which might both help the students be more involved and make this more that just a time to watch a video and have someone talk about the story and its author. These are merely suggestions and in no way are required. Please feel free to use them or some of your own.

I look forward to visiting with the students after they have seen the video. Thank you for your assistance in reaching out to help encourage your students in good reading. If I can be of any further assistance, please contact me at one of the above telephone numbers.

Sincerely.

Richard James

3. Letter to local library

October 27, 1998

Dear Friend of the Arts and Culture,

I want to share with you a wonderful opportunity for you and the families in your community to learn more about C.S. Lewis, one of the 20th century's best and most popular Christian authors. This November, 1998 will be the centenary of his birth, and due to my contributions to a recently published book on C.S. Lewis, the Cumberland County Arts Council has asked me to make a two-evening presentation on his life, work and influence, this next Friday and Saturday, November 6th and 7th. Each night the program begins at 7:00 p.m. and will be in the fellowship hall of the Burkesville Christian Church. On both evenings there will be a multimedia program - a combination of videos and discussion, on both Lewis's life and his works. There is no charge for attending and refreshments will be served each night.

C.S. Lewis wrote over forty books - both fiction and non-fiction. You may be aware both of his seven novels for children, The Chronicles of Narnia, and a recent film on his life, Shadowlands, starring Anthony Hopkins and Debra Winger. In 1957 his book, The Last Battle, received the Library Association Carnegie Medal; and in 1962, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe won the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award. I have enclosed a poster and some details about myself and the book to which I recently contributed. Also enclosed is a copy of the announcement that I have had in my bulletin for the last two weeks.

Thank you for your assistance in reaching out to help encourage the people in your community in good reading. If you have any questions or suggestions, please contact me at one of the above telephone numbers.

In His Service.

Richard James

4. Information on back cover of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. New York: Collier Books, 1970.

FICTION

Here is your passport to a most extraordinary excursion

into magical lands and enchanted happenings. If you've

never been to Narnia, you can enter it for the first time

with any of the books below …

but once you start, you II want to read everyone of

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA

by C. S. Lewis

THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE

How Aslan. the noble lion, treed Narnia

from the spell of the White Witch.

PRINCE CASPIAN

How good Prince Caspian and his army

of Talking Beasts conquered the Telmarines.

THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER

How king Caspian sailed through magic waters

to the End of the World

THE SILVER CHAIR

How captive Prince Rilian escaped from

the Emerald Witch's underground kingdom.

THE HORSE AND HIS BOY

How a talking horse and a boy prince

saved Narnia from invasion.

THE MAGICIAN'S NEPHEW

How Aslan created Narnia and

gave the gift of speech to its animals.

THE LAST BATTLE

How evil came to Narnia and Asian led

his people to a glorious new paradise.

COLLIER BOOKS

866 Third Avenue, New York, N Y. 10022

 

5. Summary of the The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (from Martha Sammons’ A Guide Through Narnia. Wheaton: Harold Shaw Publishers, 1979. pp.31-33.)

The events in this book take place 1000 Narnian years after the creation of Narnia, or the year 1940 in England. By now Digory is old professor Kirke, and the four Pevensie children - Peter, Edmund Susan, and Lucy - come to stay with him to get away from the air-raids in London. One day, Lucy, hiding in the professor's magic wardrobe, accidentallv discovers, not the expected back wall of the closet, but the crunch of snow underfoot and lines of dark fir trees ahead of her. She meets a faun, Mr. Tumnus, who explains that this is Narnia, a land where it is always winter and never Christmas because of the reign of the White Witch. When Lucy returns home, however, it is not only the exact same moment as when she entered, but, worse, none of her brothers and sisters believe her story of entering Narnia.

Next, Edmund accidentally enters Narnia through the same wardrobe and unfortunately encounters the Witch herself, who appears to him exceedingly beautiful. Enticing him with Turkish Delight and the promise of being King of Narnia, she convinces him to return, bringing the others with him for her to destroy, for a prophecy says that when four humans gain the throne, her reign will be ended. Edmund returns to the professor's house but, having become increasingly nasty from his contact with the Witch, refuses to admit that Lucy was right about Narnia all along.

Finally, all four children enter the wardrobe one day. They discover that Mr. Tumnus has been punished for disobeying the Witch, and a robin leads them to Mr. and Mrs. Beaver, who help them. The Beavers explain that Aslan, King of Narnia and of all the Beasts - the Great Lion himself - is on the move and has returned to Narnia, and all four children experience totally different reactions to his name. Peter, Susan and Lucy decide to hurry to Aslan as soon as possible. Edmund, however quietly slips off to find the Witch, only to discover that she seems quite a different person than before. Horrified that Asian has returned, she wildly sets off in her sledge, dragging with her poor, cold, hungry Edmund. All around them Springtime gradually but steadily reverses the frozen enchantment which has paralyzed Narnia for 100 years. Celandines, crocuses, primroses, laburnums, bluebells all begin to bloom - and in the very same order as they bloom in our own world

The three children reach Aslan in time to be ensnared in a brief battle in which Peter bravely kills the Witch's chief, Fenris Uff, and Edmund is rescued. He ashamedly asks forgiveness but, according to the Deep Magic, the law of the Emperor-Over-Sea, he must be killed as a traitor. Aslan offers to be sacrificed instead. Lucy and Susan then watch that terrible scene when Asian willingly submits himself to the mockery and jests of the Witch's horrible lackeys and is stabbed with a Stone Knife on the great Stone Table.

But Aslan knew that according to a Deeper Magic, if a willing and perfect victim were sacrificed in a traitor's stead, the Witch would not only lose her claim on the individual, but death would start working backwards. While Lucy and Susan are mourning his death, Aslan opens his eyes, leaps from the broken table and appears to the girls more vibrant and alive than ever, romping joyously with them to the castle. Aslan breathes on every statue of a creature frozen by the Witch and frees them, leading them all in a victorious battle against the Witch and her forces.

Peter becomes High King of Narnia and the three other children, Kings and Queens. They rule in Narnia for 15 Narnian years. During their reign, the next story takes place.

6. Chronological Order of the Narnia Chronicles and the plot outline adapted from Kathryn Lindskoog, Journey Into Narnia. Pasadena: Hope PublishingHouse,1998. pp. 109-110.

Chronological Order of the Narnian Chronicles

1. The Magician's Nephew (1900)

2. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1940)

3. The Horse and His Boy (1940)

4. Prince Caspian (1941)

5. The Voyage of the "Dawn Trader" (1942)

6. The Silver Chair (1942)

7. The Last Battle (1949)

Plot Outline of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

adapted from Kathryn Lindskoog, Journey Into Narnia

Pasadena: Hope Publishing House,1998. pp. 109-110)

About 1940, during World War II, the four Pevensie children - Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy - come to visit Professor Digory Kirk who lives in the English countryside and happens to own a magic wardrobe.

1. Lucy accidently finds herself in Narnia as she walks through the back of the wardrobe into snow.

2. After a visit with Mr. Tumnus the Faun, Lucy returns to England.

3. Edmund accidently find himself in Narnia as he walks through the back of the wardrobe and meets Jadis, the "Queen of Narnia."

4. Edmund becomes addicted to turkish delight candy while in Narnia.

5. Peter and Susan assume that Lucy's experience is unreal and Edmund dishonestly agrees with them.

6. All four children find themselves in Narnia.

7. The four learn about Narnia while visiting Mr. and Mrs. Beaver.

8. Edmund sneaks away to betray the others to the White Witch.

9. Edmund makes his way to the Witch's castle and becomes a captive there.

10. As the children and the Beavers flee, Father Christmas arrives with gifts for the children.

11. The Witch discovers that her perpetual winter is beginning to thaw.

12. Aslan appears, greets his friends and knights Peter.

13. The Witch demands her right to kill Edmund.

14. Aslan give Himself to the Witch to die in Edmund's place on the Stone Table.

15. Aslan comes back to life.

16. Aslan revives all of the Witch's victims whom she had turned into stone statues.

17. The children rule Narnia for many happy years before returning to England.

 

7. Suggested Follow-up Projects 

From: Richard James

To: Fifth Grade Teachers, CCES

Date: 11/11/98

Suggested Follow-up Projects Associated with the viewing of

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

by C.S. Lewis

1. As a writing project, write a one page essay on your most favorite character or most favorite part of the story.

2. As an art project, draw a book cover for The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

3. As a literature project, write a poem describing a scene, character or feeling related to the story.

4. As a journalism project, write a news story for a newspaper describing what happened at the stone table.

5. As a research project, write a report on the mythological characters in the story - fauns, dwarves, gryphons, efreets, ettins, hags, sprites, wraiths, etc.

6. Pretend that you are a movie critic and write a review of the movie.

7. Write a letter to C.S. Lewis, telling him what you thought of his story and asking him any questions that you might have about it.

8. Write a song about Narnia and present it to your class.

9. Write your own fairy tale or fantasy story.

10. Make a collage based on the characters and themes in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

11. Read the book, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, and compare the book with the video.

12. Read one of the other Narnian books and give a one page report on it.

Note: Of course, of all of these can be displayed or shared in class, and I am willing to come back and view them with the children. This might give them a deadline for finishing their work. If anyone has difficulty choosing which project to do, then they could be assigned to do #7 - writing the letter- and I will take the responsibility of responding as best as I can, as a "friend" of C.S. Lewis.

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Last Updated: Monday, September 03, 2001